Joslin Heyward

Joslin Heyward received her M.S. through the Wyoming Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Wyoming in 2012. Joslin grew up around the world at an early age but calls northern Wyoming home. She graduated from the University of Denver in 2005 with a B.S. in Conservation Biology and minors in Chemistry and Geography. For her senior thesis, Joslin conducted independent research studying the impacts of tamarisk presence on soil ecology and mycorrhizal fungi. After finishing college, Joslin worked for the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, Wyoming Game & Fish Department, and various wildlife consulting firms and universities, gaining a wide variety of experience ranging from sampling aquatic invertebrates and observing harvester ant behavior to trapping black-footed ferrets and conducting Breeding Bird Surveys around Wyoming. Since August 2009, Joslin has been researching the impacts of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on wildlife. This project examines the value of alternate coniferous stand types as temporal refugia for songbirds and small mammals. Her professional interests include habitat conservation, ecosystem management, management of endangered/ threatened species, and public education and involvement. In her free time, Joslin enjoys skiing, fishing, long-distance running, travel, and backcountry exploration.

Selected Presentations

Heyward, J.E., A.D. Chalfoun. “An Asssessment of Spatiotemporal Refugia for Wildlife during the Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic.” Wyoming Chapter of the Wildlife Society Annual Conference, Jackson Hole, WY.  December 7, 2011. (Oral presentation)

Heyward, J.E., A.D. Chalfoun. “An Assessment of Spatiotemporal Refugia for Coniferous Non-Game Wildlife during the Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic.” The Wildlife Society 18th Annual Conference, Waikoloa, HI.  November 7, 2011(Poster presentation)

Heyward, J.E., A.D. Chalfoun. “Assessing the impacts of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on wildlife: Which alternate stand types will best serve as spatiotemporal refugia?” Wyoming Chapter of the Wildlife Society Annual Conference, Lander, WY. November 18, 2010. (Oral presentation)

Heyward, J.E., A.D. Chalfoun. “Assessing the impacts of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on wildlife: Which alternate stand types will best serve as spatiotemporal refugia?” University of Wyoming Graduate Student Seminar Series, Laramie, WY. November 15, 2010. (Oral presentation)

Heyward, J.E., A.D. Chalfoun. “Impacts of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on wildlife and use of alternate stand types as spatiotemporal refugia.” The Wildlife Society 17th Annual Conference, Snowbird, UT.  October 5, 2010. (Poster presentation)

Heyward, J.E., A.D. Chalfoun. “Impacts of the Mountain Pine BeetleEpidemic on Lodgepole Pine Forest Species: Will wildlife use spruce/fir as temporal refugia?” Wyoming Chapter of the Wildlife Society Annual Conference, Cody, WY. November 3, 2009. (Poster presentation)