Annika Walters

Annika has been the Assistant Unit Leader for Fisheries at the WY coop unit since 2011. She is an applied aquatic ecologist with research interests in population and community ecology, fisheries, and conservation biology. Annika has an undergraduate degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University and a MS and PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Yale University. She has conducted research on a variety of topics including low flow disturbance, nutrient loading by anadromous alewife, the effects of climate change and water diversion on salmon, and phenology of phytoplankton communities. She and her students are currently working across the state of Wyoming addressing topics related to oil and natural gas development, multiple stressors, flow alteration, fish movement, and native fish conservation. Much of her research focuses on improving our understanding of how anthropogenic disturbance affects aquatic communities. She works closely with agency cooperators across the state to address questions that can help inform the management of fishes and aquatic ecosystems.


Professional Preparation and Appointments


2009 Ph.D., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT
Thesis: Community and ecosystem level impacts of disturbance in streams
2006 M.S., Yale University, New Haven, CT
2002 B.A., Princeton University, Princeton, NJ


Professional appointments

2011 – present Assistant Professor, Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming
2011 – present Assistant Unit Leader – Fisheries, USGS Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit
2011 NSF Bioinformatics Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Univeristy of Washington, Seattle
2009-2010 NRC Postdoctoral Research Associate, NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, Washington


Underwood, Z.*, E. Mandeville, and A.W. Walters. early online. Population connectivity and genetic clustering of burbot populations in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. Hydrobiologia doi: 10.1007/s10750-015-2422-y. View PDF

Entrekin, S., K.O. Maloney, K. Kapo, A.W. Walters, M. Evans-White, K. Klemov. 2015. Stream vulnerability to widespread and emergent stressors: a focus on unconventional oil and gas. PLoS ONE 10(9): e0137416. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0137416. View PDF

Godwin, B.L., S.E. Albeke, H.L. Bergman, A. Walters, and M. Ben-David. 2015. Density of river otters (Lontra canadensis) in relation to energy development in the Green River Basin, Wyoming. Science of the Total Environment 532:780-790. View PDF

Pantel, J., D. Pendleton, A. Walters, and L. Rogers. 2014. Linking environmental variability to population and community dynamics. p. 119-131. In P.F. Kemp [ed.], Eco-DAS IX Symposium Proceedings. ASLO. [doi: 10.4319/ecodas.2014.978-0-9845591-3-8.119]. View PDF

Walters, A.W., K.K. Bartz, and M.M. McClure. 2013. Interactive effects of water diversion and climate change for juvenile Chinook salmon in the Lemhi River. Conservation Biology 27:1179-1189. View PDF

Walters, A.W., M.A.G. Sagrario, and D.E. Schindler. 2013. Species and community level responses combine to drive phenology of lake phytoplankton. Ecology 94:2188-2194. View PDF

Walters, A.W., T. Copeland, and D.A. Venditti. 2013. The density dilemma: limitations on juvenile production in threatened salmon populations. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 22:508-519. View PDF

Walters, A.W., D. M. Holzer, J. R. Faulkner, C. D. Warren, P. D. Murphy, and M.M. McClure. 2012. Quantifying cumulative entrainment effects for Chinook salmon in a heavily irrigated watershed. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 141:1180-1190. View PDF

Walters, A.W. 2011. Resistance of aquatic insects to a low flow disturbance: exploring a trait-based approach. Journal of the North American Benthological Society 30: 346-356. View PDF

Walters, A.W. and D.M. Post. 2011. How low can you go? Response of aquatic insect communities to low flow disturbance. Ecological Applications 21:163-174. View PDF

West, D., A.W. Walters, S. Gephart, D.M. Post. 2010. Nutrient loading by anadromous alewives: contemporary patterns and predictions for restoration efforts. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 67: 1211-1220. View PDF

Walters, A.W., R.T. Barnes, and D.M. Post. 2009. Anadromous alewife contribute marine-derived nutrients to coastal stream food webs. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 66:439-448. View PDF

Post D.M. and A.W. Walters. 2009. Nutrient excretion rates of anadromous alewives during their spawning migration. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 138: 264-268. View PDF

Walters, A.W. and D.M. Post. 2008. An experimental disturbance alters fish size structure, but not food chain length in streams. Ecology 89: 3261-3267. View PDF