Jakopak holding a recently collared mule deer fawn.

Rhiannon Jakopak

Jakopak holding a recently collared mule deer fawn.

Rhiannon joins the Monteith Shop as a master’s student working to identify how migration can influence species distribution and population dynamics. She is broadly interested in mammal ecology, but is especially interested in better understanding that processes that determine how species occupy landscapes. She hopes that her research can help to inform better management, conservation, and policy.

She completed her undergraduate degree as a double major in Wildlife and Fisheries Biology and Management and Religious Studies at the University of Wyoming in 2016. Beginning in her undergraduate and continuing into her graduate work, she has worked on projects that address myriad aspects of mammalian ecology, from the benefits of caching behavior to the population consequences of various life history strategies. Before starting her graduate work on mule deer, she was lucky enough to work with multiple species of small mammals, including her favorite animal: the northern pouched mouse.

Her most impressive achievements to date include watching a northern flying squirrel glide across the canopy during field work and preparing a museum specimen of a maned rat. When Rhiannon isn’t being a graduate student, she likes to spend time hiking, turning roadkill into keepsakes, watching birds, reading, and playing with her critters: Laverne (ferret) and Shia (pup).

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Publications

  1. Goheen, J. R., D. J. Augustine, K. E. Veblen, D. M. Kimuyu, T. M. Palmer, L. M. Porensky, R. M. Pringle, C. Riginos, A. T. Ford, A. A. Hassan, R. Jakopak, T. R. Kartzinel, S. Kurukura, A. M. Louthan, W. O. Odadi, T. O. Otieno, A. M. Wambua, H. S. Young, and T. P. Young. In review. Conservation lessons from large-mammal manipulations in East African savannas: the KLEE, UHURU, and GLADE experiments. The Year in Ecology and Conservation Biology, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Wiley.
  2. Beagle, E., J. Bennet Ponsford, Jakopak, G. Nikolov, A. Parker. 2017. Put Wyoming first: Leave graduate tuition untaxed. Casper Star Tribune Letter to the Editor. Link. 
  3. Jakopak, R., L. E. Hall and A. D. Chalfoun. 2017. Organizing the pantry: cache management improves the quality of overwinter food stores in a montane mammal. Journal of Mammalogy 98(6): 1674–1681. Link. 
  4. Jakopak, R. It’s the little things: What we can learn from small mammals. Mpala Research Centre Memos. Link. 
  5. Jakopak, R. and J. Polasik. 2014. Fire and Black-Backed Woodpeckers in Upper Michigan. Seney National Wildlife Refuge. Research brief. Link. 
  6. Jakopak, R. 2014. The 1976 (Walsh Ditch) Fire & Wildlife. Seney National Wildlife Refuge. Research brief. Link.

Selected Presentations

* Indicates presented.

  1. Jakopak, R.,* and M. Drollette. 2018 (accepted). Writing Center Approach to Student Success in the Science Classroom. Colorado Wyoming Writing Tutors Conference. Panel discussion.
  2. Jakopak, R.* 2018 (accepted). Match made in heaven: the benefits of collaboration between science and writing centers. Rocky Mountain Writing Centers Association. Oral presentation.
  3. Jakopak, R.,* and K. Monteith. 2017. Does the petal fall from the rose? Revealing the ontogeny and consequences of ungulate migration. Wyoming Chapter of The Wildlife Society. Poster presentation. Awarded Best Student Poster Presentation.
  4. Jakopak, R.,* M. Wambua, and J. R. Goheen. 2017. Are elephant shrews more like elephants, or shrews? Quantifying life-history and demographics of Elephantulus rufescens. American Society of Mammalogists. Poster presentation.
  5. R. Goheen, D. E. Boro, R. Jakopak, T. R. Kartzinel, S. D. Newsome, and A. M. Wambua. 2017. Climate forcing, inter-individual variation, and specialization in an African small-mammal community. American Society of Mammalogists. Oral presentation.
  6. Jakopak, R.,* E. Hall and A. D. Chalfoun. 2016. Understanding the architecture of food caches in a montane mammal. University of Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day. Oral presentation.
  7. Jakopak, R.,* O. Aikens and K. L. Monteith. 2016. Assessing a critical assumption and providing context to remotely sensed data for ecological studies. University of Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day. Oral presentation.
  8. Jakopak, R.* and R. Sivanpillai. 2016. Evaluating the spectral separability of crop classes in multi-temporal Landsat imagery. University of Wyoming Undergraduate Research Day. Oral presentation.
  9. Jakopak, R.,* E. Hall and A. D. Chalfoun. 2016. Organizing the pantry: Pikas do it, too! Front Range Student Ecology Symposium. Poster presentation.
  10. Jakopak, R.,* L. E. Hall and A. D. Chalfoun. 2015. Understanding the architecture of food caches in a montane mammal. Wyoming Chapter of The Wildlife Society and Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Joint Conference. Poster presentation.