Katey Huggler

Katey is currently a MSc student in the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Wyoming. She grew up in northern Idaho and attended the University of Idaho for her undergraduate degree and graduated with a BSc in Wildlife Resources in May 2016. During her time at the University of Idaho, she worked on a variety of projects ranging from harvester ant colony research to elk survival and recruitment. After graduating from the University of Idaho, she worked as a technician on the Deer-Elk Ecology Research Project before she began her MSc in the fall of 2016. Her project focuses on nutritional and reproductive ecology of elk, including calf survival and cause-specific mortality, and quantifying the effects of coyote demography, behavior and space use on survival of neonate mule deer and elk in southwest Wyoming.

Publications

Gosselin, E., J. Holbrook, K. Huggler, R. Arkle, and D. Pilliod. 2016. Ecosystem engineering of harvester ants: effects on vegetation in a sagebrush-steppe ecosystem. Western North American Naturalist 76:82-89.

 

Selected Presentations

Huggler, K., M. Elliott, J. Knetter, P. Coates, K. Reese, and G. Gillette. 2016. “Arthropod characteristics at Columbian sharp-tailed grouse brood locations in CRP and shrub-steppe habitat”. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter Annual Meeting, Cody, WY, November 2016.

Huggler, K., M. Elliott, J. Knetter, P. Coates, K. Reese, and G. Gillette. 2016. “Arthropods at Columbian sharp-tailed grouse brood locations in CRP and shrub-steppe habitat”. The Wildlife Society Idaho Chapter Annual Meeting, Coeur d’Alene, ID,¬†February 2016.

Gosselin, E., J. Holbrook, K. Huggler, and E. Brown. 2015. “Effects of Owyhee harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex salinus) on surrounding vegetation in a sage-steppe ecosystem. Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD, August 2015.

Scholarships & Fellowships

2016 – National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

Projects