Embere Hall

Embere has a BS in Wildlife Ecology & Management, an MS in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and a PhD in Ecology. She is fascinated by the incredibly diverse ways in which organisms deal with environmental challenges. In particular, she researches the degree to which animals adjust to human-induced environmental change. Her current work examines the ecological and demographic effects of climate change, and how wildlife may respond to a changing environment through exploitation of unique habitats or behaviors. Results of her research will contribute to enhanced management programs that can minimize biodiversity loss under rapid climate change. For additional information, click here.

When she is not engaged in research, Embere enjoys traveling the backcountry via foot, horse, skis or kayak. Exploring western landscapes offers both a lot of fun, and a chance to see wildlife-conservation challenges first-hand.

 

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Professional Preparation and Appointments

EDUCATION

Ph.D. Ecology, University of Wyoming
Dissertation Title: “Behavioral plasticity and resilience of a montane mammal in a changing climate”
M.S. Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Iowa State University
Thesis Title: “Avian nest success and snake abundance in restored and remnant grasslands in northwestern Iowa”
B.S. Wildlife Ecology & Management/Spanish, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

 

PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENTS

Research Scientist (Postdoctoral)
Wyoming Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, University of Wyoming
Graduate Research Assistant (Ph.D. Candidate)
Wyoming Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, University of Wyoming
Research Director
Conservation Research Center, Teton Science Schools
Research Faculty
Conservation Research Center, Teton Science Schools
Research Assistant
Iowa Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, Iowa State University

Publications

Beever, E., E. Hall, J. Varner, A. Loosen, J. Dunham, M. Gahl, F. Smith and J. Lawler. 2017. Behavior as a mechanism for coping with climate change. Frontiers in Ecology and the EnvironmentDOI: 10.1002/fee.1502

Hall, L. Embere, A. Chalfoun, E. Beever and A. Loosen. 2016. Microrefuges and the occurrence of thermal specialists: Implications for wildlife persistence amidst changing temperatures. Climate Change ResponsesDOI: 10.1186/s40665-016-0021-4

Hall, L. Embere. 2005. Clay-colored sparrows nesting in Dickinson County. Iowa Bird Life. 74:172-173 Invited.

Riginos, C., M. Davis, M. Graham, A. Johnson, A. May, K. Ryer and E. Hall. Wildlife warning reflectors and white cloth reduce deer-vehicle collisions and risky behavior. In revision. Wildlife Society Bulletin

Jakopak, R*., E. Hall and A. Chalfoun. Organizing the pantry: cache management improves quality of overwinter food stores in a montane mammal. In revision. Journal of Mammalogy

Hall, L. Embere and A. Chalfoun. What to eat in a warming world: Do increased temperatures necessitate hazardous duty pay? In review. Oecologia

Hall, L. Embere and A. Chalfoun. Behavioral plasticity modulates temperature-related constraints on foraging time for a montane mammal. In review. Ecology

Hall, L. Embere. 2017. Behavioral plasticity and resilience of a montane mammal in a changing climate. Dissertation. University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA. Hall.Dissertation

Hall, L. Embere. 2005. Avian nest success and snake abundance in restored and remnant grasslands in northwestern Iowa. Thesis. Iowa State University. Ames, IA, USA.

 

Selected Presentations

Hall, L. Embere and A. Chalfoun. What to eat in a warming world: Do increased temperatures necessitate hazardous duty pay? Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society.  Upcoming Sept. 2017

Hall, L. Embere and A. Chalfoun. 2016. What to eat in a warming world: altering forage preferences may buffer climate stress. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Hall, L. Embere, A. Chalfoun, E. Beever and A. Loosen.  2016. Microrefuges and thermal specialists:Understanding wildlife persistence amidst changing temperatures. Oral presentation. 13th GreaterYellowstone Biennial Scientific Conference.

Jakopak, R.*, E. Hall and A. Chalfoun. 2016. Organizing the pantry. Pikas do it too! Poster presentation. Front Range Student Ecology Symposium

Hall, L. Embere, A. Chalfoun, E. Beever and A. Loosen. 2015. The importance of microrefugia:  Essential resource or irrelevant detail? Oral presentation. 3rd Conference of the North American Pika Consortium

Hall, L. Embere, A. Loosen, K. Murphy and A. Chalfoun. 2014. The importance of microrefugia in a warming world: Prime real estate or just a nice amenity? Invited oral presentation. Jackson Hole Wildlife Symposium.

Hall, L. Embere, A. Chalfoun and K. Murphy. 2014. Habitat use in a changing environment: A story of cold stress in a heat-sensitive mammal. Oral presentation. Program in Ecology Student Symposium.

Hall, L. Embere, K. Murphy and A. Chalfoun. 2013. Snow cover, forage availability and heat stress. Pika habitat use in a changing environment. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Riginos, Corinna, K. Krasnow, E. Hall, M. Graham, S. Sundaresan, T. McDowell, B. Hammond, D. Brimeyer and G. Fralick. 2013. Mule deer movement and habitat use in relation to roadways. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Hall, L. Embere, A. Loosen, E. Beever, K. Murphy, L. Yandow and L. Oles. 2012. Investigating American pika habitat selection in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Annual Conference.

Beever, Erik, S. Dobrowski, E. Hall and A. Loosen. 2012. Incorporating ecohydrologic variables into modeling of patterns of montane-mammal distribution and abundance. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Annual Conference.

Beever, Erik, S. Dobrowski, J. Wilkening, E. Hall and S. Wolff. 2012. Variability in microclimates of mountain ranges of western North America, and its effect on distribution and trend of alpine mammals. Oral presentation. MtnClim Conference.

Beever, Erik, S. Dobrowski, E. Hall and A. Loosen. 2012. Temporally shifting determinants of distribution and abundance of American pikas, and behavioral plasticity ‘softening’ ecological-niche boundaries. Invited oral presentation. Society for Conservation Biology Annual Conference.

Beever, Erik, S. Dobrowski, E. Hall and A. Loosen. 2012. Incorporating ecohydrologic variables into modeling of patterns of montane-mammal distribution and abundance. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Montana Chapter.

Hall, L. Embere, S. Dwinnell, L. Work, P. Hallsten, G. Fralick, D. Brimeyer, S. Dewey, B. Hammond, and S. Fagan. 2011. Understanding mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) movements and responses to roadways in northwest Wyoming. Poster presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Alexander, Pete, J. Newby, M. Cuthill, H. Quigley, D. Thompson and E. Hall. 2011. Preliminary results testing the efficacy of noninvasive monitoring techniques to estimate mountain lion (Puma concolor) abundance in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Poster presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Hall, L. Embere, J. McCabe and C. Smith. 2010. The effects of human development on songbird populations along a riparian corridor in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Poster presentation. The Wildlife Society Annual Conference.

Hall, L. Embere, J. McCabe, M. Karp, C. Smith and D. Wachob. 2010. The effects of human development on avian populations along riparian corridors in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Hall, L. Embere, E. Wise, K. Murphy and S. Wolff. 2010. Understanding precipitation variability in the upper Snake River watershed. Oral presentation. North American Pika Conference.

Loosen, Annie, E. Hall, K. Murphy, E. Beever and S. Wolff. 2010. Investigating American pika occupancy in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Oral presentation. The Wildlife Society Wyoming Chapter.

Scholarships & Fellowships

2016
The Wildlife Society (Wyoming Chapter) Graduate Student Scholarship
L. Floyd Clarke Graduate Scholar
University of Wyoming, Academic Affairs, Summer Doctoral Augmentation Award
Program in Ecology Travel Award

2015
University of Wyoming, Academic Affairs, Summer Doctoral Augmentation Award

2014
Reed W. Fautin Memorial Scholarship
Haub School of Envrionment & Natural Resources Student Research & Creative Activities Grant
Program in Ecology Summer Stipend Award
Biodiversity Institute Occupancy Shortcourse Tuition Remission Award

2013
L. Floyd Clarke Graduate Scholarship
Program in Ecology Travel Award

Projects